top of page

An Triail: Understanding the Verbal Noun of the Irish Verb 'to Try'

Updated: Jan 6

The concept of "an triail" is a crucial one for Leaving Certificate students studying the Irish language. An triail, which literally means "the trial" in English, refers to the verbal noun of the Irish verb "to try" (troid).


In Irish grammar, regular verbs form their verbal nouns by adding the suffix -(e)adh to the stem of the verb. For example, the verbal noun of the verb "to speak" (labhairt) is "labhairt" (speech), and the verbal noun of the verb "to write" (scríobh) is "scríobh" (writing).


However, the verbal noun of the irregular verb "troid" is not formed in the same way as regular verbs. Instead, it is "an triail" (the trial). This is because "troid" is an irregular verb, and its verbal noun is therefore irregular as well.



How is An Triail Used to Form the Future Tense in Irish?

The concept of "an triail" is important because it is used to form the future tense in Irish. In Irish, the future tense is formed by using the verbal noun and conjugating it with the appropriate pronoun and auxiliary verb.


For example, the future tense of the verb "to go" (téigh) is formed by using the verbal noun "an té" (the going) and conjugating it with the auxiliary verb "beidh" (will be). Therefore, "I will go" is "beidh mé ag dul" (lit. "will be I at going").


Similarly, the future tense of the verb "to try" (troid) is formed by using the verbal noun "an triail" (the trial) and conjugating it with the auxiliary verb "beidh" (will be). Therefore, "I will try" is "beidh mé ag triail" (lit. "will be I at trial").



By understanding "an triail" and how it is used to form the future tense in Irish, Leaving Certificate students can better understand and use this important aspect of the language. For more information about irregular verbs in Irish, check out this page. For a comprehensive list of Irish language learning resources, visit this website.

5 views0 comments
bottom of page